Nov 012012
 

Some cool blogging for money images:

First_Adsense_W00T
blogging for money

Image by aaron_anderer
I started blogging informally back in January of 2008. This has never been a money making endeavor, just something for fun. In March of 2008 I setup a Google Adsense account to serve up ads through my website and blog. Google doesn’t pay out until you have reached the 0 USD mark. So, putting ads on my site has reimbursed me for about 50% of my online expenses.. not bad for doing nothing. :)

I’m not quitting my day job, but if the revenue stream negates my online costs, that is great.

Spinoza Contemporaries
blogging for money

Image by ocean.flynn
From Rembrandt to Spinoza, the Golden Age of the Netherlands casts its long shadow into the 21st century. Candle light flickered and the sand in the timer flowed silently but he barely noticed, he was so engrossed in his reading. With his left hand he held unto the globe while all around him in the darkness others slept deeply. The work of these candle-light-scientists continues to be honoured today. Indeed their century, the 17th century is now recognised as one that was crowded with genius2. Damasio chose a reproduction of this painting by Dutch artist Gerrit Dou entitled Astronomer by Candlelight (c.1665) for the cover of his splendid,insightful book1 (2003)entitled Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain in which he combines his own research as head of neurology at the University of Iowa Medical Center with the writings of Spinoza, a contemporary of Rembrandt.

In Chapter 6, "A Visit to Spinoza," Damasio revisited the historical period which he calls a century of genius in which Spinoza’s life unfolded. He noted that it was in the Netherlands in the 17th century that the makings of contemporary justice through such enlightened minds as that of Hugo Grotius (1583-1645) who introduced modern concepts of international law (1625). It was also during this period that modern capitalism emerged in the Netherlands (2003:231).

While he lived in the most tolerant country of the 17th century Spinoza’s iconoclastic ideas regarding truth claims and legitimization of truth were too radical even for Holland.

Spinoza was born into a prosperous family of Sephardic Jewish merchants who had fled Portugal during the Inquisition shortly before Spinoza was born.

Their acquired wealth from trade in sugar, spices, dried fruit and Brazilian wood was Spinoza’s inheritance. But he valued his intellectual independence more than money and learned to live frugally even refusing professorial positions so as not to have his time or thinking compromised. He never owned his own home preferring to occupy only a bedroom and study. In that bedroom was the one object upon which Spinoza fixated. This was the four-poster, canopied and curtained bed where he was conceived, birthed and in which he finally died. It is called a ledikant and contrasted sharply with the armoire or cupboard bed that was more common in Amsterdam homes of the 17th century (to be continued p.229). Other than that he only needed paper, ink, glass, tobacco and money for room and board. He reminds me in some ways of our contemporary Russian mathematician Perelman who learned to live on 0 a month to devote himself solely to the elevated apolitical study of pure mathematics.

Damasio chose a reproduction of this painting by Dutch artist and Rembrandt (1606–1669) student from 1627 to 1628, Gerrit Dou (1613 – 1675) entitled Astronomer by Candlelight (c.1665) for the cover of his splendid, insightful book in which he combines his own research as head of neurology at the University of Iowa Medical Center with the writings of Spinoza, a contemporary of Rembrandt.

In Chapter 6, "A Visit to Spinoza," Damasio revisited the historical period which he calls a century of genius5 in which Spinoza’s life unfolded. He noted that it was in the Netherlands in the 17th century that the makings of contemporary justice through such enlightened minds as that of Hugo Grotius (1583-1645) who introduced modern concepts of international law (1625). It was also during this period that modern capitalism emerged in the Netherlands (2003:231).
Continued at Before, During and After Spinoza’s Life (Building on Damasio 2003) and at
Google Docs

No on 8
blogging for money

Image by Earthworm
The Religious Right always bring out the lewd in me. No matter how much I tell them it’s about love they will see, in their minds, depravity. So I aim to please. By celebrating my body. Because after all that’s what the Christians are really trying to suppress isn’t it? — Sexualtiy, sensuality and the divine feminine.

By campaigning for gay marriage we will inevitably shoot ourselves in the foot no matter how "straight" we try to appear because the Right are never going to accept that we are who we are. If we win this one it is because straight people decided to stand up for us. Meanwhile we are again subjected to open hatred. I try not to let it make me angry, but it is hard not to take it personally.

I created this photo ten days ago for a fellow blogger who was one of the "8 on 8" queer writers blogging for eight days to raise money for the campaign. She made a "No On 8" quilt of fans with signs. I did not post this photo here until today on account of the shooting in the foot phenomena. This was my only effort on the campaign or maybe it’s an anti-effort. The best I could do for this campaign was to stay out of the way (and vote no) because I still think that this issue is a huge waste of community activism while at the same time I did hope that love would prevail. The love of our straight families and friends.

The gay marriage issue is to the fundamentalist Christian a thinly disguised hatred and disgust for us. They will pour money into it and by responding to it, the gay community allow the Christians to set the agenda. The question we should be asking is why are so many rights attached to the status of being married? Why is my health care dependent on my partner? Why doesn’t everybody have health care? Why does the IRS get to say who gets a tax deduction when two or more people sell a house they own together?

The fight we should be fighting is to sever those rights from what is basically a religious institution. Separation of church and state please. Government control out of our lives please. All the cultural and sentimental attachment to the idea of marriage is just a form of flattery of an unenlightened institution. Imitation being the highest form of flattery. It robs us of our confidence in our own queer culture and our own social arrangements and that probably goes for everyone’s freedom too.

GregC

 Posted by at 11:28 pm